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Hybrid diesel/solar power plant in Russia

Hybrid power plant: Hybrid renewable energy systems (HRES) are becoming popular for remote area power generation applications due to advances in renewable energy technologies and subsequent rise in prices of petroleum products. A hybrid energy system usually consists of two or more renewable energy sources used together to provide increased system efficiency as well as greater balance in energy supply

Russia’s first hybrid diesel/solar power plant:

hybridRussia launched a 140 kW plant (that utilizes battery storage, solar panels and diesel fuel) in the nature reserve located in the Altai Republic and it has been operating in test mode since March 1, 2013. It is expected to meet most of the electricity needs in the mountainous village of Yailyu where it is located, saving about 50 percent of current diesel consumption.

Solar power will account for 30-40 percent of the plant’s total kW output, with the rest supplied by its diesel generator. The generating plant will have a minimal guaranteed service life of at least 25 years…

This is a test run for future electrical needs all over the remote ares of Siberia…

hybrid_2It is a lot like a hybrid car that utilizes fossil fuels and batteries. Working together they make an efficient car and in the vast wilderness of Russia, these new hybrid power plants just make sense…

I found this interesting and it has to be good all the way around for everyone. Siberia is unbelievably remote and I am sure that more days than not, many villages in Siberia are without power. I know that is an issue with our little Russian Village that we have a home in and we are located only 400 km from Moscow…

This is a good answer to replace that aging infrastructure that is crumbling down from the Soviet era. In fact this is a great idea for all countries to look into and try to utilize renewable energy sources at the same time as we use fossil fuels…

Post by Kyle Keeton
Windows to Russia…

The copy scores 50.9 in the Flesch Reading Ease test, which is considered fairly difficult to read…

3 Comments

  1. barney June 10, 2013

    This is fantastic and bravo Russia!

  2. blackseabrew June 11, 2013

    As an engineer I believe smaller more distributed power is the way to go for many regions. Population densities and the cost to distribute power simply don’t warrant 100 megawatt (or larger) power plants. I like what I’ve seen from Russia’s consideration of different types of fuel sources such as propane-based alternate fuel systems for gasoline powered cars.

    Probably the largest challenge in the US is that of air-conditioning. We just assume power is available and design commercial and, in particular, residential housing that would be unbearable without any type of air conditioning. Sooner or later America is going to have to come to the realization that energy is a limited resource. There are answers, but the way we build the big suburban housing developments don’t match with them…in any number of ways. For instance, a typical roof on a suburban house in latitudes south of Kansas City, is 20-30 years. Could be 50-100 years using the same materials if it was painted white, which would has been proven to lower the electric bill by 20%. But the average suburban homeowner would not tolerate white roofs. Housing associations won’t permit them. A dark energy-wasteful dark shingle is considered visually attractive and therefore the only option. I could go on.

  3. key August 12, 2014

    Wonderful topic!…

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