Svetochka is gone, but the coffee is good…

imagesThe Tiny Russian Village is getting less people all the time. I am all alone on the bottom side and so the wells are staying fuller than when the village is fuller. Therefore, it has been three days since filling the wells. But, I am filling them this morning. Boza and I got up late, due to getting in bed late and for once we had daylight as we turned the wells on. I feel like I have been run over by a big fat truck and they did not stop to see if I was still alive…

Ate wrong, slept wrong and took my pills at the wrong time for my heart…

It looks as if around Tuesday, we will get the car back. It is running and almost ready. They will tie up a few loose ends and it will be done. It is getting the new exhaust, new heater core and several other new parts to round the old girl out. One thing that has been lacking with Sammy the Volga is the heater and we are going to get that fixed this time. One thing about Russia is that if the car heater does not work good, life gets rough. No air conditioning is needed, but have that heat working…

The young man running the shop came out to the Tiny Russian Village last night and picked Svetochka up. She got to the train station on time and talked to me before bed. I finally fell asleep around midnight. We found out something interesting last night; people in the Big Village do not all know where the Tiny Russian Village is! These poor guys got lost, our mechanic had the son of the head of the orthodox Church in the Big Village with him and they have never been out to our end of the world. Big Village is like a huge city in comparison and people always give this American a strange look when I tell them I live in the Tiny Russian Village called Kommuna…

Crazy American!

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Svetochka just called and she is doing good. She is back in Moscow and plans on taking a bag of carrots, potatoes and beets to her mother today. The fruits of our labor will be given to family, so that family will share in the results. Food from the villages is very important. It is grown with no chemicals and free of all contaminates…

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Almost ready to turn off the wells and my cup of coffee is almost done. I think since I feel so bad today; it is raining, my sugar levels are messed up and that imaginary truck keeps running over me, I will end this early today. I have some images to post, but I will think about that later, after I get sorted out. Boza is sleeping again and the place is warm and cozy. Svetochka said she really missed us and I can tell that she loves the Tiny Russian Village again…

They bought this place many years ago for Sveta’s son Misha to spend summers at. That is a very strong tradition for Russians. Kids spend summers in the villages and dachas. Mandatory and if you do not, you are a bad parent…

It dawned on me that I may be watching a little kid in a few years, as I work on the Tiny Russian Village home…

If that happens? He will learn English, how to plant gardens and how to fix fences and stuff. Sounds like a winner to me….I need a helper, even if he is a little one…

WtR


kKEETON @ Windows to Russia…

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