Orthodox Christians begin the first week of Passover (Easter): On Monday, in Russia…

Orthodox Christians will begin celebrating the first week of Passover. On Monday (April 9th, 2012), the Patriarch of Moscow and All Russia Kirill will hold a liturgy in the Donskoy Monastery of the capital…

During the holiday period it is traditional that churches will keep their doors open as a sign that through his death, Christ has opened the way for people to heaven…

Also, according to tradition, anyone can climb the church tower and ring the bell, sharing with others Easter joy…

More Easter Traditions in Russia:

In Russia and several other parts of the world Easter is observed through one whole week. Each day of the week is referred by unique names and traditions. It is believed that most of the traditions followed during Easter have been derived from pagan and Christian beliefs…

Easter in Russia begins with the popular custom of triple kissing followed by exchange of eggs stuffed with goodies as a present. This is the most distinguishing feature of celebrating Easter in Russia…

The very beginning of the Easter is marked with people gather at sunrise early in the morning. This way they predict the weather of the forthcoming summer…

Wearing new clothes is a very important part of Russian Easter. It symbolizes the beginning of new life. It is believed that the tradition is followed since the early days of Christianity. The story goes like hundreds of people were baptized at sunrise to adapt Christianity on the first Easter day and were made to wear new clothes as a part of the custom…

People these days generally start wearing new clothes after the end of Lent. People of all age group, specially the young kids are seen in bright and very colorful clothes. The most popular color of Easter is red…

A common belief of Easter is that the gates to heaven remain open during this whole week. And whoever dies goes straight to the heaven during the Easter week…

Days of the week of Russian Easter:

Monday and Tuesday: The first two days of the Easter week is referred as ‘Bathing’. The custom of the event is to douse water over those who are caught sleeping during the morning service. This is a very fun event and is taken part and enjoyed by all…

Wednesday: The third day of the Easter week is popularly known as ‘Hailing’. The common tradition is not to work on the Wednesday during Easter to keep the crops safe from hail and sleet…

Thursday: This is the fourth day of the Easter week and is one of the most important days of the festival. Those who have died are remembered through prayers for the whole day…

Friday: This is the day of mercy and is referred as the ‘Forgiveness Day’. Friends, relatives and close ones seek forgiveness from each other through various day long events…

Saturday: A fun filled day as the weekend begins is the day of ‘Round-Dancing’. People dress up in beautiful attire and gather together to take part in dance parties…

Sunday: This is the most important day and is known as ‘Red Hill’. This is when Easter is observed welcoming the beginning of spring. A straw figure is made and placed at the summit of the hill. Men and women from all parts of the city gather to sit in a circle, and sing and dance. Since wedding is not allowed during Lent, this day is observed as a matchmaking time. It is believed that girls and boys will finally get their perfect partner that will end in marriage…

So there you have in in a nutshell!

Orthodox Easter is different from the Western Easter that I grew up with in America. This article by far does not cover all traditions of Russian Easter but it will give you an idea…

Another neat tradition for Easter in Russia: http://windowstorussia.com/russia-has-willow-sunday.html

Have a nice Easter and I know that Easter is being celebrated already in the West. But in the East we have lots of fun times yet until the Easter is officially here…

Kyle Keeton
Windows to Russia!

Search Windows to Russia for Orthodox Easter…


kKEETON @ Windows to Russia…

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