Once Again Woe is We the Web duth Weave…

Rainbow flag flapping in the wind with blue sk...
Rainbow Flag…

For the first time in the Moscow’s history, the authorities are allowing the members of Russia’s gay community to stage a protest…

Scarcely has the former Moscow Mayor Yury left his workplace when the city he shaped for almost two full decades made a change that was contradictory to the norm…

The quiet murmurer of disapproval has increased and the fingers are being pointed at a Medvedev. Stating that he should have seen this coming…

Russia still has a “Wild West” flare about her and that is part of the attraction Russia holds for me. But this flare could cause issues from certain groups that vehemently express the desire of being anti gay…

I hear the murmurs stirring amongst the breezes and they are not conductive to pleasantness…

Could this move be too soon after the demise of a popular mayor?

Russia: Easter – April 27, 2008

Hello,

My wife and I had an article before Easter in the West on March 23rd, 2008. I had an article then about the Russian Easter. I am now bringing it back up…

The Article Here (LINK).

Russian Easter!

Easter in Russia is celebrated according to the rituals laid down by the Eastern Orthodox Church. Apart from differences in rites and rituals, the bone of contention between Western Christians (Protestants and Roman Catholics) and the Eastern Orthodox Christians is the date of Easter celebration. In determining the vernal equinox, the Eastern Church uses the Julian calendar while the Western Church employs the Gregorian calendar.

2008 date:
March 23 (Western)
April 27 (Eastern)

Moreover, whereas Western Churches hold Easter sunrise services, in Russian Orthodox Church Easter services last all through Saturday night. The congregation gathers in the church or cathedral on Saturday evening and takes part in an Easter vigil commemorating the buried Christ.

Easter service is also held in a different way. Already on a Saturday night people put on their best clothes and come together in dark churches that symbolize a gloomy world without the light of faith.

The holy week is pretty much busy in most Russian homes. Once a spring cleaning is done, it’s time for baking Easter bread. The eggs are painted on Holy (“Clean”) Thursday and fresh Easter cakes (Paskha) are prepared on Saturday. It’s a tough time as Saturday is the strictest fasting day when orthodox Christians are almost not allowed to eat. Tasting food while cooking is also forbidden. But everyone is looking forward to the feast, and the cooks do their best. It is a tradition to bless Easter eggs and bread in the church. Fasting ends after the Easter Mass and feasting begins.

The Easter Day starts with a long family breakfast. The table is decorated with fresh flowers, pussy-willow branches and, of course, painted eggs. Besides Easter bread and Paskha that are only eaten on Easter, there is lots of other food on the table like sausages, bacon, cheese, milk, etc. – so basically everything that was prohibited during the Forty Day Fast. However, the feast starts with a piece of aromatic Easter bread.

Sharing food on Easter has been a long tradition in Russia. That is why after breakfast people visit their friends and neighbors exchanging eggs and small Easter breads. If the first egg you get on Easter is a truly gift given from the heart, it will never go bad, says an old Russian wisdom.

It is also common practice to visit cemeteries and bring eggs, some bread and beer to the graves. In doing so, people let deceased loved ones enjoy the feast.

Strangely enough the weather on the Easter Day is usually very nice and sunny. “The sun plays”, say the Russians. It is an old custom to open the cages and let birds go free on Easter.

In the past, only men were allowed to ring church bells. Bell-ringing could be heard everywhere creating a joyful atmosphere. There was no Easter without swinging on a swing. It was great fun, especially for kids and girls.
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It is still very popular to roll Easter eggs on the ground or down a hill. The aim of the game is to break the eggs of other players without damaging your own ones. Experienced players pay special attention to the form of the eggs and even make special gutters for the eggs to have a better roll. Farmers believe that rolling eggs keep the soil fertile.

Painted eggs are an international Easter symbol. In Russia Easter eggs are believed to possess magic powers. They are supposed to protect crops against hail damage, keep cattle healthy and ward off evil spirits. An Easter egg hidden in the foundation of a house would bring the owners happiness and prosperity. It should even be possible to make yourself look younger by rolling an Easter egg over the face. So it’s no wonder that painted and blessed Easter eggs used to be kept as lucky charms for a long time. One day someone started making and painting wooden eggs. Porcelain, golden, silver and gemstone eggs are very precious. The most exquisite ones are probably the Imperial Easter Eggs designed by the world-famous jeweler Peter Carl Fabergé’s for the Russian Royal Family.

Traditional Easter eggs are red. Of course, it is also possible to use other colors. In Russia eggs are often cooked together with onion skins or wrapped in colorful fabric remnants. Spinach dyes eggs green and beet root gives them a red tint. Easter eggs get a nice shine if rubbed with vegetable oil.
At midnight ringing church bells announce the resurrection of Jesus Christ. Priests come to the altar holding a crucifix and candles. Solemnly singing, they walk through the church and then around it. Everyone lights the candles and follow the procession. Churches and cathedrals are now full of singing voices and candle lights.

The Orthodox liturgical chant substitutes a Catholic organ and creates a very special atmosphere. The Mass goes on till dawn. Today, the president and other politicians also attend the Easter Mass.

As there are no bench rows in orthodox churches, some people find it difficult to stand the whole mass that goes on for hours. But the impressive ceremony is worth every effort. The Easter service ends early in the morning when the priests go around the crucifix. Numerous church bells start ringing, the singing gets louder, and finally the priests tell everybody to forgive each other and seal it with a hug and a kiss. Everyone happily follows this appeal. The traditional Easter greeting can be heard everywhere: “Christ is risen!” and the answer: “He is truly risen!”

Kyle & Svet

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It is a Heyday in the Russian Press…

I am ignoring the Western press because all they can do is try to analyze what is happening in Russia and with that they have failed miserably. But the Eastern press is going all different directions and it is a Heyday in the Russian press…

So…

Moscow Mayor Yury Luzhkov, who was sacked on Tuesday by Russian President Dmitry Medvedev, plans to appeal in court, according to Interfax. RT

Next…

Russia’s Supreme Court has not received any complaints from Moscow ex-mayor Yury Luzhkov over his dismissal, despite media reports that he plans to appeal the decision, a court spokesperson said on Wednesday. RIA

Next…

Independent Russian magazine The New Times published late on Tuesday a copy of a letter written by sacked Moscow Mayor Yury Luzhkov to Russian president Dmitry Medvedev a day before he was dismissed. RIA

Next…

Moscow Mayor Yury Luzhkov’s abrupt loss of the president’s confidence and his ensuing departure from office could be seen as sensational news, as he seemed the consummate survivor; on the other hand, there was no other way out of the situation. RIA

Next…

This is the letter that Yury sent to Medvedev and Medvedev’s office swears that it had nothing to do with the firing…

Just click each photo to read… (Russian Only!)

Next…

Russians have mixed feelings about Moscow ex-mayor Yuri Luzhkov, the Russian Public Opinion Study Center (VTsIOM) said on Tuesday.

Thirty-three percent of the respondents described Luzhkov as an efficient manager, who did a lot for high living standards in Moscow. The opinion was mostly voiced in the Central Federal District (42%) and the North Caucasus (40%) and by supporters of the Communist Party and the Just Russia Party (39%).

Thirty-four percent have the opposite opinion. They think that Luzhkov failed to resolve city problems and Moscow successes resulted from the status of that city. As a rule, that opinion was voiced by representatives of the Liberal Democratic Party (46%).

Sixty-two percent of the respondents described Luzhkov as strong-minded (62%) and energetic (61%). Fifty-five percent called him competent, and 52% said he was broad-minded. Forty-three percent said he was an amicable person, and 38% called him intelligent. Forty-nine percent said Luzhkov was corrupt, 48% called him cunning and 44% defined him as “a politician inclined to intriguing.”

The poll was done on September 18-19, 2010. The center polled 1,600 adults in 140 cities, towns and villages in 42 regions. The error keeps within 3.4%.

Next…

Yury Luzhkov skipped a Cabinet meeting on Tuesday, following the announcement of his dismissal as mayor of Moscow. He reportedly stayed in his office until lunchtime, receiving his aides and members of the Moscow legislature.

He left City Hall a few hours later, refusing to comment on his dismissal to the media.

Earlier in the day, Luzhkov reportedly filed his resignation as a member of the ruling United Russia party. The head of the party’s central executive committee, Andrei Vorobyov, told reporters it had been dated as September 26, two days before Luzhkov was fired.

Luzhkov had been the mayor of Moscow since 1992. A mass campaign against him had been going on in state-run media over the past few weeks, and law-enforcement agencies have repeatedly tried to bring him to justice for condoning corruption in the upper echelons of Moscow’s City Hall.

Luzhkov’s dismissal comes just a week after his 74th birthday and a day after his return from a brief vacation in Central Europe. One of his former deputies, Vladimir Resin, was appointed as acting mayor. And Moscow’s current Cabinet will have to go along with Luzhkov.

Next…

What I sense from the people I see in Moscow, is that enough people really like Mayor Yury and that this could be detrimental to Medvedev. The wind is blowing the gossip that Mayor Yury may be in the running for president. So in effect the Russian news is trying to portray the fact that Yury should have done a better job of working with Medvedev…

Putin has made a few statements but as I have said in the last few months. Putin has allowed Medvedev to do his own thing and sink or swim on his own…

That is enough, don’t you think?

Russia: Taking A Walk In The Village!

Recently in the Village Boza & I took a walk. It was about 6:00am & Svet was still snoozing! :) So here is our walk from the beginning to the end…..

Boza waiting for me to catch up to him!
Boza leaving me to chase a bird!
Beautiful Isn’t It!
We found lots of interesting ground growth!
We found flowers!
The sun came up while we walked!
The sun cast a glow on the Village!
This Village is very unique!
Home Sweet Home!


That is it…. Boza & I went back to bed where our sweetie was still dreaming. Boza and I love to walk in the village…

Russia Has No Grain, Well Maaaaybe…

Seed and wither flower of buckwheat
Buckwheat…

Once again here we go again…

Russia’s ban on grain exports may be lifted as soon as the harvest figures are established, Russia’s President Dmitry Medvedev stated today at a meeting on the financial stability of the agricultural sector.

It seems that they want to tell the truth and they just can not bring themselves to that point….

The truth is, that after Sveta and I made a few trips into the Russian countryside. We discovered that there is grain and lots of grain to be exact…

The huge grain silos are full and the new fields are planted and already a beautiful green. What fields have not been planted are being plowed and planted as this story is being written…

The stores in the big villages near our little village, are full of buckwheat. (Our village does not have a store.)  The cafe we eat at had buckwheat as a side dish every time we were there. (4 times) The store near us in Moscow where we live, has never been out of buckwheat at anytime…

The only lack of supplies in food is from the initial onslaught of people who are hording the products and that comes from a whole different ball game in the past…

I am not going to say that some areas did not have issues, but I am going to say that,  I think there is a little fibbing going on…