The electric company jammed their van on a boulder and left it in the road and I moved it. Thank you guys for the boulder…

I saw that the electric company guys had an issue when they came and tried to drive across my yard area in the wrong place. They ran into a boulder that the snow plow in the winter time had dredged up and it ended up in the road blocking the road halfway. I did what any good homeowner would do and utilized this chunk of massive stone and blocked my walkway (not a driveway) with it. Sveta wants me to paint a happy face on it and I will do just that…

It’s just a Tiny Russian Village: Electric Company is allocating resources…

I almost met my old grouchy bear limits with this boulder. It is around 300 kilos and while I use to be invincible, in my mind when young, this rock gave me realization lessons…

It is a boulder: a boulder is a rock fragment with size greater than 256 millimeters (or 10.1 inches) in diameter. It definitely meets that requirement easily….(I always wondered why, 256 mm and not 300 mm and or why not 10 inches and or 11 inches and or 12 inches? I dunno…)

Yes when you grab something that weighs 6X what you weigh and you are as old as the hills, life gets interesting…

Thanks electric guys, I wanted that tidbit of rock and just did not have the energy to dig it up. Yet, they stimulated the incentive within me and I did it!

WtR

kKEETON @ Windows to Russia…

Permission to reprint in whole or in part is gladly granted, provided full credit is given...

7 thoughts on “The electric company jammed their van on a boulder and left it in the road and I moved it. Thank you guys for the boulder…

  1. Narendra Modi can be sentenced to rigorous punishment by the Indian Supreme Court for the communal mass murders and the elimination of political competitors and opponents using police and mafia, if he is not already assassinated by a terrorist. If Sarkozy can be sent to jail, so can Modi be sent. Indian law enforcement officers are deluded about what is law and what is illegal and had chosen not to listen to their conscience, but that cannot be for long because Dhanush is watching.

  2. Kyle,
    I agree that “The Guardian” website being pro-West will obviously lie but this doesn’t mean that it will not report a truth about Russia that favours the West and so the report has 50% chance of being correct, which could be verified through other sources.
    In fact, it is possible that even you are probably silenced or you are not who you claim to be or you have manged to keep the website after compromising someone or you are the wildest creature that has used all of its life’s wisdom to survive.
    As for your 2nd point, it has nothing to do with overgrown rock other than perhaps reminding the Hollywood movie “The Rock”.

  3. Indian intelligence agents seem to have poisoned the water can supplied to my house to decrease my sexual potency. If true, the agents and their spouses must be made sterile and shown to all.

  4. “Windows to Russia”
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/oct/01/russia-extends-foreign-agents-law-to-critics-of-military-and-security
    Russia extends ‘foreign agents’ law to critics of military and security
    Legislation now covers citizens who study and report on those agencies and people working within them
    Police officers detain a journalist who holds a placard reading ‘You are afraid of the truth’. Photograph: Natalia Kolesnikova/AFP/Getty Images
    Andrew Roth in Moscow
    Fri 1 Oct 2021 12.45 BST (Diamond Soul Annie Besant’s birthday)
    Russians who study and report on the problems faced by the country’s military, space agency and security services, as well as the millions of people who serve in those agencies, can now be named foreign agents, as Russia expands restrictions on its own citizens under the controversial law.
    Russia’s main security service has published a comprehensive, 60-item list of topics that could lead to individuals who so much as share reports of physical abuse or official corruption on social media being added to a quickly growing register of “foreign agents” who must file extensive financial reports and face other restrictions.
    The list published by the FSB, the Russian intelligence and law enforcement agency, includes collecting information on military procurements, reporting on financial troubles at the Russian space agency Roscosmos, revealing information about soldiers’ morale and past military experience, and the results of investigations into abuses in the military and security and intelligence services.
    The list is clearly aimed at keeping a lid on scandals that have erupted around the country’s vast military-industrial complex in recent years, which have been aided by the proliferation of smartphones with cameras and the availability of vast troves of personal data on illegal black markets.
    Those revelations range from the exposure of the Salisbury poisoners as members of Russian military intelligence, to the exposure of Russian anti-aircraft weapons moving into Ukraine before the downing of MH17, to corruption scandals involving procurements of foods, reports of an experimental submarine sinking after a deadly fire, and reporting on vast corruption at Roscosmos.
    Russia has claimed its “foreign agents” restrictions simply mirror those in other countries, mainly the US. But the law has clearly emerged as a cudgel to be used against disloyal media and other local critics who have little, if any, connection to a foreign government.
    The new FSB list would send a chilling message to Russian journalists and thinktankers who focus on the military and regularly publish reports about planning, procurements, weapons development, and other aspects of Russia’s defence policy. It would also threaten a similar label for ordinary Russians who publish personal accounts or photographs that show vast troop movements, as happened ahead of Russia’s military buildup on the Ukrainian border this spring.
    None of the information is believed to contain government secrets but its receipt by a foreign government or organisation, possibly by posting it on the internet, could be considered grounds for a “foreign agent” label. Once a person is put on the list, there is no process yet for that person to be removed.

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